AIX disk mirror -링크

AIX에서 미러디스크 교체하는 방법.

http://www.unix.com/aix/30039-replace-failed-root-disk-aix.html

Disk Replacement

How to replace a bad drive? (mirrored disks)

# lsvg -p rootvg

rootvg:

PV_NAME           PV STATE          TOTAL PPs   FREE PPs    FREE DISTRIBUTION

hdisk0            active            542         264         109..00..00..46..109

hdisk1            active            542         278         88..00..00..81..109

*Here your making sure that both disks are assigned to the volume group

# lsvg -l rootvg

rootvg:

LV NAME             TYPE       LPs   PPs   PVs  LV STATE      MOUNT POINT

hd5                 boot       1     2     2    closed/syncd  N/A

hd6                 paging     64    128   2    open/syncd    N/A

hd8                 jfslog     1     2     2    open/syncd    N/A

hd4                 jfs        6     12    2    open/syncd    /

hd2                 jfs        127   254   2    open/syncd    /usr

hd9var              jfs        4     8     2    open/syncd    /var

hd3                 jfs        37    74    2    open/syncd    /tmp

hd1                 jfs        3     6     2    open/syncd    /home

hd10opt             jfs        21    42    2    open/syncd    /opt

dumplv              sysdump    14    14    1    open/syncd    N/A

*Here your checking to make sure there’s a 1:2 relationship, meaning that there are copies.  Notice dumplv.  It’s not copied so we need to make sure dumplv data isn’t on the failing disk.  To check, run;

$ lslv -l dumplv

dumplv:N/A

PV                COPIES        IN BAND       DISTRIBUTION

hdisk0            014:000:000   100%          000:014:000:000:000

This is telling us that the logical volume dumplv is on hdisk0.  If hdisk1 is the failing disk, then we are okay.  Otherwise, we would have to migrate the data over to the good drive and proceed.

# unmirrorvg rootvg hdisk1

# reducevg rootvg hdisk1

# rmdev -l hdisk1 –d

Before you power down, it’s a good idea to check the system to make sure it will boot from the good drive.  Do that by performing;

# bootinfo -b

hdisk1

This tells you what drive it was last booted up.  We want to change this to boot to the new drive, so;

# bosboot -ad /dev/hdisk0

And check bootlist

# bootlist –m normal –o

NOW WE CAN POWER DOWN THE BOX AND REPLACE THE DRIVE

Once disk has been replaced, power up the server.  Once at command prompt, run;

# cfgmgr

This will install the new device and allow the OS to see it.

# lsdev -Cc disk

hdisk0  Available 40-60-00-4,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive

hdisk1  Available 40-60-00-8,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive

Make sure that the OS says it’s available.  If it is, we can assign it to a volume group.

# extendvg rootvg hdisk1

This will assign it a PVID and assign it to the volumegroup rootvg to make it available for use.  Now we can mirror;

# mirrovg rootvg

This will take a little while as it’s taking all data now on hdisk0 and making a copy to hdisk1.

# lsvg -p rootvg

rootvg:

PV_NAME           PV STATE          TOTAL PPs   FREE PPs    FREE DISTRIBUTION

hdisk0            active            542         264         109..00..00..46..109

hdisk1            active            542         278         88..00..00..81..109

Once it’s mirroring, we can make sure it’s assigned to rootvg by doing the above.  We can also check to make sure there’s copies;

# lsvg -l rootvg

rootvg:

LV NAME             TYPE       LPs   PPs   PVs  LV STATE      MOUNT POINT

hd5                 boot       1     2     2    closed/syncd  N/A

hd6                 paging     64    128   2    open/syncd    N/A

hd8                 jfslog     1     2     2    open/syncd    N/A

hd4                 jfs        6     12    2    open/syncd    /

hd2                 jfs        127   254   2    open/syncd    /usr

hd9var              jfs        4     8     2    open/syncd    /var

hd3                 jfs        37    74    2    open/syncd    /tmp

hd1                 jfs        3     6     2    open/syncd    /home

hd10opt             jfs        21    42    2    open/syncd    /opt

dumplv              sysdump    14    14    1    open/syncd    N/A

Now we need to modify the bosboot to recreate the boot image;

# bosboot –a

Double check your bootlist to make sure hdisk1 is in there;

# bootlist –m normal –o

YOUR DONE

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